slow

slow adj 1 *stupid, dull, dense, crass, dumb
2 Slow, dilatory, laggard, deliberate, leisurely can apply to persons, their movements, or their actions, and mean taking a longer time than is necessary, usual, or sometimes, desirable.
Slow (see also STUPID), the term that is the widest in its range of application, may also be used in reference to a thing (as a mechanism, a process, or a drug) that is the opposite of quick or fast in its motion, its performance, or its operation. In its varying applications slow often suggests a reprehensible or discreditable cause (as stupidity, lethargy, indolence, or inaction)
{

a slow student

}
{

slow wits

}
{

slow movements

}
{

he is as slow as a snail

}
{

slow in getting results

}
{

an unimaginative man, slow of comprehension— Times Lit. Sup.

}
but it may suggest either extreme care or caution
{

a slow but capable worker

}
{

slow to take offense

}
{

he is slow in making changes

}
{

he spoke with a slow, slightly thick precision, making elegant gestures— Wouk

}
or a tempo that is required by nature, art, or a plan or schedule
{

a slow convalescence

}
{

a slow stream

}
{

a slow movement in music

}
{

a slow train

}
or a falling behind because of structural or mechanical defects or untoward difficulties
{

a slow watch

}
{

the train is slow tonight because of the snow-storm

}
Dilatory is relatively a term of restricted application referable to persons or to things for which persons are responsible as their actors, performers, or creators and implying slowness that is the result of inertness, procrastination, or indifference
{

a dilatory correspondent

}
{

though dilatory in undertaking business, he was quick in its execution— Austen

}
{

he was temporizing, making, with unconscious prudence, a dilatory opposition to an impending catastrophe— Bierce

}
Laggard is even more censorious a term than dilatory, for it implies a failure to observe a schedule (as for arriving or performing) or to obey a call or demand promptly; it frequently suggests loitering or waste of time
{

laggard pupils keep a whole class back

}
{

for Love was laggard, O, Love was slow to come— Millay

}
{

in its coverage of spot news events, radio has been especially laggardRovere

}
{

directed him and another general to ... prod laggard manufacturers into speeding up production— Kahn

}
Deliberate (see also DELIBERATE 2) applies to persons, usually directly but sometimes indirectly, and then is applied to things for which a person is responsible; the term suggests absence of hurry or agitation and a slowness that is the result of care, forethought, calculation, or self-restraint
{

deliberate enunciation

}
{

deliberate movements

}
{

he returned with the same easy, deliberate tread— Cather

}
{

she ate her food in the deliberate, constrained way, almost as if she recoiled a little from doing anything so publicly— D. H. Lawrence

}
Leisurely also implies a lack of hurry or a slowness that suggests that there is no pressure for time; the term applies not only to persons and their acts but to things that have no relation to persons
{

breakfast was a leisurely meal—Archibald Marshall

}
{

his departure, like all his movements, was leisurely. He did not take the first available boat or the second— Waugh

}
{

took leisurely leave, with kisses all around, of a half dozen young men— K. A. Porter

}
Antonyms: fast
slow vb slacken, *delay, retard, detain
Analogous words: *moderate, temper, qualify: reduce, abate, *decrease, lessen
Antonyms: speed
Contrasted words: accelerate, quicken, hasten, hurry (see SPEED vb)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • slow — slow …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • slow´ly — slow «sloh», adjective, adverb, verb. –adj. 1. taking a long time; taking longer than usual; not fast or quick: »a slow journey, a slow messenger. 2. behind time; running at less than proper speed: »The fat man is a slow runner. Seldom readers… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Slow (DJ) — Slow DjSlow Levi Finland 2011 Birth name Vellu Maurola Also known as …   Wikipedia

  • Slow — (sl[=o]), a. [Compar. {Slower} (sl[=o] [ e]r); superl. {Slowest}.] [OE. slow, slaw, AS. sl[=a]w; akin to OS. sl[=e]u blunt, dull, D. sleeuw, slee, sour, OHG. sl[=e]o blunt, dull, Icel. sl[=o]r, sl[ae]r, Dan. sl[ o]v, Sw. sl[ o]. Cf. {Sloe}, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slow — [ slo ] n. m. • 1925; mot angl. « lent » ♦ Danse lente à pas glissés sur une musique à deux ou quatre temps; cette musique. Des slows langoureux. ● slow nom masculin (de slow fox) Abréviation de slow fox. Danse lente où les partenaires se… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Slow — is an adjective describing a low speed or tempo.Slow can also refer to: * Slow (band), a Canadian band from the mid 1980s * Slow (Producer DJ), a Finnish producer and DJ * Slow (song) , a song by Kylie Minogue *Slow motion, a technique in… …   Wikipedia

  • slow — [slō] adj. [ME slowe < OE slaw, akin to Du sleeuw, ON slær, dull < ?] 1. not quick or clever in understanding; dull; obtuse 2. a) taking a longer time than is expected or usual to act, move, go, happen, etc. b) not hasty, quick, ready, or… …   English World dictionary

  • Slow — «Slow» Сингл Tricky из альбома Knowle West Boy Выпущен …   Википедия

  • slow — 〈[sloʊ] Adj.; Mus.〉 langsam (zu spielen) (Tonpassagen beim Jazz) [engl., „langsam“] * * * slow [slo :, engl.: sloʊ] <Adv.> [engl. slow = langsam] (Musik): Tempobezeichnung im Jazz, etwa zwischen adagio u. andante. * * * slow   [englisch,… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • slow — slow, slowly In current English the normal adverb for general purposes is slowly (We drove slowly down the road / She slowly closed the door). Literary uses of slow as an adverb died out in the 19c • (As the stately vessel glided slow beneath the …   Modern English usage

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.